What are active minutes?

« Go Back



Your Fitbit tracker recognizes and awards active minutes when the activity you're doing is more strenuous than regular walking, which includes everything from a brisk walk to a cardio workout or run.

How do I earn active minutes?

All Fitbit trackers calculate active minutes using metabolic equivalents (METs). METs help measure the energy expenditure of various activities. Because they do so in a comparable way among persons of different weights, METs are widely used as indicators for exercise intensity. For example, a MET of 1 indicates a body at rest. Fitbit trackers estimate your MET value in any given minute by calculating the intensity of your activity.

You earn active minutes for activities at or above about 3 METs.  To stay in line with the Center for Disease Control's (CDC’s) “10 minutes at a time is fine” concept, minutes are only awarded after 10 minutes of continuous moderate-to-intense activity. You can view the CDC’s recommendations on the CDC website.

If an activity gives you active minutes one day and fewer active minutes the next day, remember that the intensity of exercise is key. Often what seems like the exact same amount of effort over the same distance in fact differs slightly enough to change your active minutes total.

How do I achieve my active minute goal?

By default, you are given a starting goal of 30 active minutes a day based on the CDC recommendation of 20-30 minutes of daily moderate-to-intense activity. You can always change your active minutes goal to meet your personal needs.

Trackers with heart-rate sensing do a better job of recognizing active minutes for non-step-based activities, such as weight lifting, strenuous yoga, and rowing. If your tracker doesn't have heart-rate sensing, your active minutes will be lower for non-step based activities.

The more calories you burn the higher your MET value, so therefore the more calories you burn the higher your total active minutes. Assuming you're active for at least 10 minutes at a time, green spikes on your calorie graph typically indicate that you’re earning active minutes.

What happened to very active minutes?

If you're used to seeing very active minutes on your dashboard, beginning in April 2015 you'll start seeing active minutes instead. To align with CDC recommendations, the new metric more accurately reflects both moderate and high-intensity exercise. Because active minutes include moderate exercise, you should see:

  • A higher active minutes total than you previously saw with very active minutes.
  • An improved ranking in group leaderboards for active minutes.
  • An increase in active minutes when you look at data for previous days.

All of these improvements are designed to give you a more accurate view of your active time throughout the day.

Last updated: June 9, 2015
I found this article helpful I found this article helpful

I did not find this article helpful I did not find this article helpful
Need help fast? The Community has answers.
Or, if you'd prefer to get in touch: